Organic Sultanas

Organic Sultanas

Organic Sultanas

For specific product inquiries, we would like to point out that our minimum order quantity per product is 750 kg.

Use

Sultanas are made from table grapes, they are baking ingredients and complement savory dishes.More…

Harvest

Depending on the region from summer to autumn.More…

Production

Sultanas are made from grapes of light, seedless varieties.More…

Flavor

Sweet, spicy and yet mild, juicy.More…

Origin

Wine growing regions in Europe, Asia, Africa and America.More…

Yield

The “Thompson Seedless” seedless grape variety, which is the most important for sultanas, accounts for around 95 % of California’s yield. Our organic sultanas come from Turkey and Uzbekistan, which make only a relatively small but high-quality contribution to the production of sultanas.More…

Sustainability

Grapes for organic sultanas are grown without artificial pesticides. Due to the ecological cultivation, each of these vineyards provides a valuable contribution to the microclimate. Vines, mixed crops and undergrowth with field crops or flowers contribute to the erosion of the often dry soils. On the other hand, vineyards cultivated in this way are an important part of biodiversity. By dispensing with insecticides and other pesticides, microorganisms and plants that are threatened elsewhere thrive.More…

Special feature

Sultanas were once extracted from the sultana grape, which was so named in honour of the sultan. Today, Thompson Seedless grapes are the raw material for sultana production.More…

Organic Sultanas Organic Sultanas

Use

The light-colored sultanas are particularly popular in mueslis, snack mixes such as student fodder or dried fruit compositions. They are soft and tender and therefore taste particularly good from hand to mouth. The large, light-colored grapes are also very popular in fine pastries. In fruit slices, muesli bars, Stollen and Zopf the tender sultanas taste excellent. Sultanas are a delicious ingredient for fruit salads, leaf salads or lentil salads. Sultanas taste good in rice pots and go just as well with lamb and mutton as with exotic fish recipes. In meat ragouts and sauces, they are the perfect counterpart to strong spices such as chilli or coriander.

Production

Table grapes are dried for grapes of all varieties. These are often grape varieties that are too sweet to make wine. From early spring onwards, the vines are cultivated in all wine-growing regions. The vines are pruned and newly tied up. If fruit sets appear on the faded grapes from the end of June, surplus side shoots and weak sets must be removed by hand.

Even during the summer the work does not stop. Excessive weeds must be removed. During the ripening period, nets or airy tarpaulins are often used so as not to endanger the harvest by feeding birds. When the grapes are fully ripened, they are cut by hand and transported to the collection point in cracks.

Origin

The drying of sultana grapes to the popular raisins has a tradition in Turkey. This is probably the first time that a light, seedless grape variety has been cultivated here. It was named Sultana in honour of the ruler of that time. Sultanas now also come from the USA and other growing regions. In California it is also the “Thompson Seedless” that go into sultana production.

Sustainability

Sustainable organic viticulture thrives on the renunciation of chemistry. Vineyards are traditional workplaces, modern associations, above all in organic viticulture, ensure economic efficiency and thus sufficient livelihoods for the workers and their families. The wine cultivated in rows keeps off wind and thus protects the soil and its inhabitants from drying out and erosion. The gentle drying of the sultanas in the sun is also sustainable, as there is no need to use energy such as electricity or machinery.

Harvest

Grapes used in the production of grapes are carefully selected. They are then hung on tensioned wires to dry. Now Petrus is in demand. Warm weather and plenty of sunshine are essential for sultanas and other grapes to dry out to the desired humidity level of 17%. If a prolonged period of bad weather develops during this time, the grapes must be brought to a heated room for drying. Fortunately, however, during the harvest season – especially in September – the weather in wine-growing regions is usually constantly good.

Geschmack

Sultanas are considered particularly tasty, they bring a lot of sweetness with them.

Yield

The total world annual yield of grapes is increasing slowly but steadily. Projections based on empirical values assume an annual increase of 2%. The current world harvest is expected to be around one million tonnes. The USA alone contributes to this proud figure with an annual production of sultanas of around 350,000 tonnes.

Special feature

Only the grapes from the light sultana grape or the Thompson Seedless variety may be called sultanas. Sultanas are rich in carbohydrates and vitamin A.

Product features

Nutritional table

EnergieEnergy
291 kcal | 1238 kJ
EiweißProtein
2,46 g
KohlenhydrateCarbohydrates
68 g
ZuckerSugar
68 g
FettFat
0,55 g
gesättigte Fettsäurensaturated fatty acids
0,2 g
einfach ungesättigte Fettsäurenmonounsaturated fatty acids
0,03 g
mehrfach ungesättigte Fettsäurenpolyunsaturated fatty acids
0,2 g
BallaststoffeDietary fiber
5,2 g
NatriumSodium
21 mg

Nutritional value may vary in natural products.

Note

12,5 kg Karton mit PE-Innenbeutel 12,5 kg cardboard box with PE-bag
Kühl und trocken lagernKeep cool and dry
12 Monate ab Produktionsdatum12 months from production date